Jim Cummings should certainly receive an Oscar nomination for his incredible work in the brand-new Christopher Robin movie. As both Tigger and Winnie the Pooh, the 65-year-old voice actor provided such an affable, rumpled, and sweet life to the thoughtful bear that it actually breaks your heart. The performance delivered by Jim Cummings understands something far more keenly than the film surrounding it. He manages to tap into the veins of melancholy and humour that is pitched at a perfect frequency which will speak to both adult and child alike. His portray of Pooh is an accidental philosopher and agreeable nuisance, offering nonsensical adages in a deliberate, friendly murmur ringed slightly with sadness. You actually want to gently yank Winnie the Pooh from the screen and take him home with you.

Marc Forster as Director

For the most part, Christopher Robin is a fantastic movie that shouldn’t be missed. It’s beautifully directed by none other than Marc Forster, which might seem strange at first until you recall that, in addition to successfully directing Machine Gun Preacher, World War Z, and James Bond, he also directed Finding Neverland. He brings a welcoming art to the Christopher Robin story, borrowing from Spike Jonze, Terrence Malick, Joe Wright, and Ewan McGregor to give the movie a whimsical, elegant glow. Pooh, along with his animal friends, are magnificently subtle features of animation that are textured so carefully that you’ll almost smell the woodsy, cosy mustiness of their fur.

Human Co-Stars

The human co-stars are quite charming too. There’s loads of talking at one stage to absolutely nothing when acting in a film like this one, but Ewan McGregor, certainly capable of such silliness and such stiffness, sells the re-awakening of Christopher Robin quite superbly. He strikes emotional and playful chords that will be accessible to children without adults thinking its cloying. Evelyn, the wife of Christopher, portrayed by Hayley Atwell, further brightens the film with her appearance. She is not featured a lot in the film, but once she appears, she is certainly noteworthy.

The Storyline in Christopher Robin

A sentimental pull is what the movie is all about. You might initially expect an August family movie that will win you over with a bittersweet tale of childhood and the need to grow up. This is present in the movie’s opening where a montage of Christopher’s life is portrayed, but as the movie continues, it starts to reduce itself to something based on not allowing work to get in the way of what truly matters in life. The script, written by Allison Schroeder, Tom McCarthy, and Alex Ross Perry, provides real wisdom about childhood and appreciating the moment you are in.
For a huge Disney movie in summer, the new Christopher Robin is splendidly restrained and quaint. Although it doesn’t follow its own advice by letting the lessons and themes develop more organically instead of guiding the film down a too-familiar family trope, it is undeniable that this is an outstanding movie that shouldn’t be missed.