High Roller: The Stu Ungar Story is based on a true story and the life of Stuey Ungar, who entered and changed the casino world. Called the superstar of gambling, Suey took a liking into poker and other gambling at an early age. His obsessive gambling habits got him in trouble and also into massive debt with the mob.

Gambling Obsession

The film tells the tale of the man that is known as the most gifted card players ever; he was barely in his teens when he started playing cards. Stu Ungar’s father was a small-time bookmaker as well as a nightclub owner, and he was connected with the mob. He was highly impressed with the abilities of his son, although extremely worried about his reckless instincts when it came to gambling. His worries were with a reason as Stu Ungar lost all his bar mitzvah money in one afternoon at the racetrack. He was the most talented player when it came to cards, but in picking the right horse, less than average.

Stu Ungar In Deep Debt with the Mob by Age 20

Stu Ungar was already in massive debt with the mob by the time he turned 20, plus he owed lots to other loan sharks. He was offered a chance to settle his debts, should he agree to enter the gin rummy card tournament held in Las Vegas. This is where Stu Ungar wins big and at the same time discovers that the lifestyle Las Vegas offers, is what he likes most. In 1980 to 1981 he became a legend and won the World Series Poker Tournament. Stu still remembers his misfortune at the racetrack, and he almost got a new appetite for prostitutes, drugs, high roller betting and placing bets at the horseraces. Only when Stu hit rock bottom, he finally decides to return, basically from nowhere, yet he manages to win the World Series Poker Tournament for the third time. This 1996 victory celebration is short as he returns to his addiction, drugs and merely hectic lifestyle.

In 1982 Ungar Married Madeline Wheeler

Ungar married Madeline Wheeler in 1982, and she gave birth to Stefanie in the same year. Madeline also had a son, Richard, who Ungar adopted, in 1989 he committed suicide. Ungar had a reputation as both a brilliant poker player and a gin drinker. He merely destroyed all opponents and won most tournaments. Many casinos requested him to not play at their establishments as no one entered most competitions. The reason, the fear that the participants might run into the unbeatable Ungar. Most believe Ungar was born a talented poker player and if he could control his substance abuse and drink, he might have still been able to scare off players in the Las Vegas Casinos.